Speak for Yourself

Claire Duffy's blog about public speaking and communication (in real life). Speak well, do well!

Telling Stories Like Ira Glass

ira-glass

I love hearing an expert explain their work.  Ira Glass is a master of modern storytelling. With 17 years on air, his radio show,  This American Life  is a phenomenon, a weekly non-fiction monologue with an audience of 18 million, and the most popular podcast in the US, with more than a half million people downloading each episode.

Glass says for broadcasting you need two things: anecdote and reflection. But anecdotes (as we know –  read more on this here) need  to be interesting. Listeners should feel like they’re on a train going somewhere, that something is happening, but they wonder what and why. You need to bait them, to be constantly asking questions  which keep them engaged. Reflection should be interwoven with the anecdote to give it meaning, and keep up the momentum.

Of course, this approach is also ideal for public speaking and presentations. But enough from me, it’s much more engaging to hear it from the master himself.

I found this  first on Telling Stories Like Ira Glass | Ethos3 – A Presentation Design Agency.

One comment on “Telling Stories Like Ira Glass

  1. Pingback: Glass Said… | The Arkside of Thought

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This entry was posted on 07/12/2012 by in Audience connection, Presenting a speech, Public speaking, Speeches on video and tagged .

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